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Tag Archives: Tennessee Product Liability Claim

ProdLiab

How Long Do I Have to File a Product Liability Claim in Tennessee?

By John Willis |

Product liability claims in Tennessee are subject to certain time limits. Specifically, Tennessee law states that a person who is harmed due to a defective product must bring a lawsuit within 6 years of the date of injury. This is known as the statute of limitations. But there is also a second deadline, known… Read More »

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Third St. Louis Jury Finds Link Between Talcum Powder, Ovarian Cancer

By Brad Burnette |

Although Johnson & Johnson continues to deny that there is any connection between the use of its talcum powder and ovarian cancer, a third jury in St. Louis, Missouri, has disagreed and awarded a multi-million product liability judgment to a plaintiff who alleged such a link. Jury Awards $65M in Punitive Damages to Stage… Read More »

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Tennessee Judge Dismisses Product Liability Claim Against Gun Manufacturer

By John Willis |

In Tennessee, a product manufacturer can be held legally responsible for injuries caused by a defective product. The idea is that the manufacturer is in the “best position” to protect the public from any potential harm arising from the design or manufacture of its own products. But how does product liability work when the… Read More »

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How Industry Standards Apply to Product Liability Cases

By John Willis |

There are many ways to prove negligence in a product liability case. For instance, a manufacturer can be held liable for “negligent design,” where there is a defect inherent in the property’s design. This does not mean, however, a product must be 100 percent safe or incapable of injuring someone. Rather, Tennessee courts look… Read More »

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