Switch to ADA Accessible Theme
Close Menu
Fox & Farley Attorneys at Law, an Association not a Partnership
Tennessee Personal Injury Lawyer
Tennessee Dangerous Drugs Lawyer
Tennessee Dangerous Drugs Lawyer
Hablamos Español Local 865-457-6440 Toll Free 866-862-4855
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Instagram

Tag Archives: Tennessee Personal Injury Cases

Jury

Understanding the Right to a Jury Trial in Tennessee Personal Injury Cases

By Brad Burnette |

In most civil cases, such as personal injury claims, either party has the right to demand a trial by jury. Furthermore, the parties have the right to question potential jurors about their potential biases and prior knowledge of the case. Tennessee law further allows each party–the plaintiff and the defendant–to challenge (exclude) four potential… Read More »

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn
accident2

Can the Defendant in My Personal Injury Case Have Me Followed?

By John Willis |

A personal injury case is not simply a matter of proving the defendant’s negligence. The plaintiff must also demonstrate to the court–i.e., the jury–how the defendant’s negligence injured them. The defendant, in turn, will try to minimize or reject the extent of the plaintiff’s injuries in an attempt to avoid liability. Surveillance Video Defeats… Read More »

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn

How Industry Standards Apply to Product Liability Cases

By John Willis |

There are many ways to prove negligence in a product liability case. For instance, a manufacturer can be held liable for “negligent design,” where there is a defect inherent in the property’s design. This does not mean, however, a product must be 100 percent safe or incapable of injuring someone. Rather, Tennessee courts look… Read More »

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn

In Personal Injury Cases, The Thing Does Not Always Speak for Itself

By Brad Burnette |

In personal injury cases, a plaintiff may establish a defendant’s liability through a legal doctrine known as “res ipsa loquitur.” As explained by Tennessee courts, this rule—named for the Latin phrase, “the thing speaks for itself”—holds “the injury was probably the result of negligence, even though the exact nature of the negligence is unknown,… Read More »

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn
Segment Pixel